We will never meet a space-exploring or pillaging Alien

The thought of Aliens capture the imagination, countless worlds beyond our own with advanced civilizations. But I have strong suspicions that we will never meet an Alien. I’ve always had my doubts, and then I read an article recently which uses very sound reasoning to preclude their existence (I don’t have the reference for the specific one).

DON’T EXIST

It basically goes:

  1. The Universe is roughly 13 billion years old – plenty of time for Aliens to develop technology
  2. The Universe is gigantic – plenty of places for various Aliens to develop technology
  3. We would want to find other Aliens – Other Aliens would want to also look for other life
  4. Why haven’t they found us? Why haven’t we found them?
  5. Because they don’t exist
When we first started surveying space and searching for Aliens we would have found them, they, as we do, would have been transmitting signals indicating intelligence.
NEVER MEET
But there is also another, less compelling, reason. The Universe appears to be expanding, and accelerating that expansion. Unless worm-hole traversal is found to be practically feasible, the whole meeting part will never happen.
OTHER REASONS
Here’s some more links to other blogs and articles I found, which also add some more information and other reasons which logically prove that Aliens don’t exist:
I guess, that one or even several logical reasons cannot prove absolutely that Aliens do not exist, we can only be 99.9% or more confident for example. Unless we search all the cosmos and conclude that none exist, can it be an absolute fact. We could have an Alien turn up tomorrow, and explain they have searched the Universe and only just recently found us, and that it’s only them and us and that their home world is hidden behind another galaxy or nebula or something. So logic alone is not definitive, but it is certainly a good guide if the logic itself is not disproven.
Take Fermat’s Last Theorem for example, it was proven, “358 years after it was conjectured”. There were an infinite amount of solutions to the problem, and so an exhaustive evaluation was not practical, a mathematical verification was required. Many believed it to be true of course, but Mathematics being a science, required proof.
So unless we can prove that Aliens don’t exist with scientific observation, and not just with probability, one cannot say with authority that Aliens don’t exist, but at the same time, one definately cannot believe that Aliens do exist without significant proof.

Mining Space

It’s quite an aspirational idea – to even look at mining asteroids in space. It may feel like it’s something unreachable, something that’s always going to be put off to the future. But the creation of a new company Planetary Resources is real, with financial backers and with a significant amount of money behind them. We’re currently in transition. Government, and particularly the U.S. government is minimizing its operational capacity for space missions, while the commercial sector is being encouraged and growing. For example, Sir Richard Branson’s, Virgin Galactic, as well as other organisations are working toward real affordable (if you’re rich..) space tourism and by extension commoditisation of space access in general, bringing down prices and showing investors that space isn’t just for science anymore, you can make a profit.

I recently read a pessimistic article, one where the break-even price for space mining is in the hundreds of millions of dollars for a given mineral. One needs to be realistic, however in this article, I think the author is being way too dismissive. You see, there are many concepts in the pipeline which could significantly reduce the cost of earth-space transit. My most favored is the space elevator, where you don’t need a rocket to reach kilometers above the earth (although you would likely still need some sort of propulsion to accelerate to hold in orbit).

But as well as being across technology, a critic needs to also be open to other ideas. For example, why bring the minerals back to Earth? Why not attempt to create an extra-terrestrial market for the minerals? It may well cost much more to launch a large bulk of materials into orbit, than to extract materials from an asteroid (in the future). With space factories building cities in space.

Of course, I still think space mining is hopeful at best, let’s balance despair with hopeful ideas.

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