Why did Open Source Bounties Fail?

I’m shocked. I thought Bounties would supercharge Open Source development. You were the chosen one! (cringe)

So today, I wanted to post a bounty for Stasher. I did so on BountySource, but then I realised it was broken and abandoned. I looked further afield and it’s the same story, a digital landscape littered with failures.

Bounty Source

Is one of the better ones, limping along. They need a serious financial backer to grow their community faster.

  1. They seem to have a lot of server issues. Have a look at their recent twitter feed [https://twitter.com/Bountysource]
  2. When I posted my bounty, I did expect a tweet to go out from their account (as per my $20 add-on). Nothing. Either that subsystem is broken, or it has never been automated.
  3. Bounty Search is broken – “Internal server error.” in the console log.
  4. We know what I think about good security architecture. If people can’t talk about security correctly, it doesn’t matter if they know about bcrypt, but can they properly wield its power?
  5. No updates on Press since 2014

Freedom Sponsors

They don’t have enough of a profile, to excite me about their future. This has been executed on a shoe-string budget apparently. (I’ll try posting a bounty here if the Bounty Source one lapses)

  1. Only 12 bounties posted this year (Jan-Nov) – only 4 of those have workers, 2 of those look inactive. But at least search works.
  2. Their last Tweet was 2012

Others

http://bountyoss.com/, http://cofundos.com/ are down.

Analysis

This shouldn’t have happened. It failed because these startups ran out of cash and motivation.

There is massive potential here. So far we’ve seen MySpace, we need Facebook execution. And whoever does this, needs a good financial backer with connections to help grow the community.

I hope to see an open source foundation, maybe Linux Foundation, buy Bounty Source.

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